Category Archives: Book Six: Swimming in the Rainbow

Swimming in the Rainbow (Coming Soon)

Following a devastating attack on her home that kills her only friend, young Zoë is torn from her solitary, fantasy-filled life in pastoral Germany.

With help from an extraordinary man, a man fashioned of courage and poetry, she flees deep into the Mediterranean archipelago, barely a step ahead of the soldiers pursuing her.

Magic and realism collide as she discovers why she is so important, why the world is wounded by the loss of dream and myth.

Swimming in the Rainbow dips into the “lost years,” close to the end of The Child of the Erinyes.

Photo via Shutterstock

Reviews for Swimming in the Rainbow

Swimming in the Rainbow, though not yet formally published, achieved semi-finalist status in the Amazon Breakthrough Novel Contest. Here are some reviews it garnered from readers:

“The writing here is dreamily beautiful; I am reminded of Patricia A McKillip’s marvelous book The Forgotten Beasts of Eld.”      Miz Ellen

Swimming in the Rainbow is poetic prose at its best.”      Elise Abram

“Rebecca Lochlann’s Swimming in the Rainbow is among the most beautifully written novels I’ve ever encountered. The content lives up to the magic of the name.”      Dora McAlpin

“The lively imagination and intelligence of the girl with a backdrop to the darker events around her reminded me of the deliciously dark tale of Pan’s Labyrinth.”         Jarucia Jaycox Nirula

“This is so wonderful I’ll have very little to say about it, I’m afraid. It reminds me of Cornelia Funke, but darker and more mature. Definitely the best-written piece I’ve found here. Unconventional, sure, but organically unusual, not contrived to impress or shock. I can’t pick out anything to praise in particular, because it’s all praiseworthy. Truly original ideas, beautifully executed. Some readers might not get it, but those who do will treasure the experience. Five stars, unreservedly, and a vote for the Grand Prize, when the time comes.”      Leah Davidson

“What appears to be an effortless flow of detail, imagery, and pathos captivated me from the start. Engaged by the author’s romantic writing, lyrical flow, and emotionally-packed action, I was brought in close to the empathetic characters and primed for the tragic loss, which I felt intensely. I was hypnotized by the writing. Here, the author describes the moon: “How shyly that orb moved, like a bright wonderful girl who believed herself hidden, but, drifting behind the trees as she did, she merely accentuated her presence.” How desperate the last scene, how tragic the loss of a dear friend. “I felt that Teófilo himself caused the wind to flutter those leaves in farewell.” The sadness lingers even after the excerpt is done. Bravo!”   Ann Keeling

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